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Get the Samsung Galaxy S9 at the UK’s lowest monthly price with no upfront fee. When it comes to switching, we’re fast. Our Virgin TV V6 box, where awesome entertainment comes together. Virgin” and “Maiden” redirect here. White has traditionally been associated with ritual purity, innocence and virginity.

Although virginity has social implications and had significant legal implications in some societies in the past, it has no legal consequences in most societies today. The social implications of virginity still remain in many societies and can have varying effects on an individual’s social agency based upon location. Instead “junge Frau” can be used. It is, however, dated too and rarely used. Although typically applied to women, like English, it is also applied to men, in both cases specifically denoting absence of sexual experience.

When used of men, it does not carry a strong association of “never-married” status. The concept of virginity has significance only in a particular social, cultural and moral context. Although virginity has historically been correlated with purity and worth, many feminist scholars believe that it is a myth. They argue that no standardized medical definition of virginity exists, there is no scientifically verifiable proof of virginity loss, and sexual intercourse results in no change in personality. She critiques the notion that sexual activity has any influence on morality or ethics. There are varying understandings as to which types of sexual activities result in loss of virginity.

A person who engages in such acts without having engaged in vaginal intercourse is often regarded among heterosexuals and researchers as “technically a virgin”. In a study by researcher and author Laura M. Carpenter, many men and women discussed how they felt virginity could not be taken through rape. They described losing their virginities in one of three ways: “as a gift, stigma or part of the process. Carpenter states that despite perceptions of what determines virginity loss being as varied among gay men and lesbians as they are among heterosexuals, and in some cases more varied among the former, that the matter has been described to her as people viewing sexual acts relating to virginity loss as “acts that correspond to your sexual orientation,” which suggests the following: “So if you’re a gay male, you’re supposed to have anal sex because that’s what gay men do.

And if you’re a gay woman, then you’re supposed to have oral sex, because that’s what gay women do. And so those become, like markers, for when virginity is lost. That’s the ‘technical virginity’ thing that’s going on. She and other researchers titled their findings “Would You Say You ‘Had Sex’ If ? Laura Lindberg stated that there “is a widespread belief that teens engage in nonvaginal forms of sex, especially oral sex, as a way to be sexually active while still claiming that technically, they are virgins”, but that her study drew the conclusion that “research shows that this supposed substitution of oral sex for vaginal sex is largely a myth”. Nearly 95 percent of people in the study agreed that penile-vaginal intercourse meant ‘had sex. But the numbers changed as the questions got more specific.

About 80 percent of respondents said penile-anal intercourse meant ‘had sex. About 70 percent of people believed oral sex was sex. However, the data for anal sex without vaginal sex reported by males did not reflect this directly. Early loss of virginity has been shown to be linked to factors such as level of education, desire for deviance, independence, biological factors like age and gender, and social factors such as parental supervision or religious affiliation, with the most common being sociodemographic variables. Along with this, sexual abuse has also been shown to have a link to later risky sexual behaviors and a younger age of voluntary sexual intercourse. Sexual initiation at an earlier age has been associated with: less frequency of condom use, less satisfaction and more frequency of non-autonomous reasons for that first sexual encounter.

Adverse effects for losing virginity at an early age include lower chance of economic stability, lower level of education, social isolation, marital disruption and greater medical consequences. These medical consequences consist of an increase in STDs, cervical cancer, pelvic inflammatory disease, fertility and unwanted pregnancies. The first act of sexual intercourse by a female is commonly considered within many cultures to be an important personal milestone. Its significance is reflected in expressions such as “saving oneself”, “losing one’s virginity,” “taking someone’s virginity” and sometimes as “deflowering. Feminine sexual practices have revolved around the idea of females waiting to have sex until they are married.

Virginity is regarded as a valuable commodity in some cultures. In the past, within most societies a woman’s options for marriage were largely dependent upon her status as a virgin. Those women who were not virgins experienced a dramatic decrease in opportunities for a socially advantageous marriage, and in some instances the premarital loss of virginity eliminated their chances of marriage entirely. It was the law and custom in some societies that required a man who seduced or raped a virgin to marry the girl or pay compensation to her father.

Some cultures require proof of a bride’s virginity before her marriage. In some cultures, the nuptial blood-spotted bed sheet would be displayed as proof of both consummation of marriage and that the bride had been a virgin. Coerced medical virginity tests are practiced in many regions of the world, but are today condemned as a form of abuse of women. Researchers stress that the presence or absence of a hymen is not a reliable indicator of whether or not a female has been vaginally penetrated.