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Please forward this error screen to 66. Hundreds of readers share their tips on finding and forming the right group, choosing books for book club, when and where to meet, and having a great book club discussion. I get bookish questions in my inbox all the time, and a frequent one is this: I want to form a book club but I have no idea where to start. Darcy, I put a timely spin on timeless women’s issues. Welcome to Modern Mrs Darcy!

I want to form a book club but I have no idea where to start. I know offline about what makes a successful book club. I was shocked at the number of book clubs that formed through meetup. People join book clubs for different reasons: some people want to read new books, some people want to discuss their reading in-depth, some people just want to get out of the house.

Happy book clubs made the group’s expectations clear from the beginning. As for numbers, most of you keep your groups to ten people or less. But if you can’t gather eight people, don’t despair! Many successful groups began with two friends talking books over coffee—and they gradually added members over time. Many libraries, bookstores, and community centers run their own book clubs.

These clubs are typically run by an employee, who chooses the books. There are pros and cons to such groups: you don’t have to do any planning, but you don’t have much control, either. If you’re lucky—and many of you are—your group will gel over time. Many of you said your book club members are now your closest friends—even if you started as strangers. Successful groups have a systematic way to choose their books, but those systems vary considerably.

Some clubs alternate between fiction and nonfiction, serious literature and not-so-serious. Some clubs have general guidelines: no romance, nothing over 600 pages, nothing published within the last ten years. Members take turns choosing the book, no questions asked. Members take turns: the member whose month it is selects several titles, and everyone else votes. Members each bring a suggestion and everyone votes. After hearing all your book club stories, I recommend filling up the calendar well in advance. Clubs differ on their policies: some will only choose a book if no one has read it, so they can experience reading it for the first time together.

Some clubs will only choose a book if someone has read it and can vouch for it. What makes a great book club novel? What did you think of the book? What is the significance of the title? It’s worth noting that a great discussion starts with the right book—not just one that you think is amazing, but one that’s chosen for its ability to generate conversation. Great contenders are books that have ambiguous endings, interesting narrative structures, or unreliable narrators.