Dating based on myers briggs
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Myers Briggs personality test is based on the personality indicator developed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers. The Myers Briggs personality test is generally based on the personality indicator dating based on myers briggs by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers.

Their development of the test occurred in the 1940s and was built upon psychological research performed by Carl Jung in the 1920s. The type test is based on a series of questions that gather information on how a person usually responds or relates to various situations. The answers to these questions are calculated to determine the person’s individual personality type. Important insights can be gained by understanding personality type, such as optimal career choice, better romantic partnerships, and paths to personal growth. Tests that draw on the method by Briggs and Myers sort people into 16 different types which are organized by four pairs of opposite traits. These personality traits are grouped into four categories that describe the way in which a person interacts with the world. Everyone experiences both traits in each pair, but usually one is more dominant than the other in the Myers Briggs personality test.

Extroverts are energized when in the company of other people, unlike Introverts who are usually reserved, quiet, and prefer to be by themselves. Extroverts like speaking their minds and thrive in social situations. They are usually popular and well-liked by other people. Extroverts may feel down and become drained if they’re not in the company of others for too long. Introverted people are quiet, reserved, and more comfortable being alone than an Extroverted person.

Introverts prefer to rely on themselves for entertainment rather than seeking interaction or stimulation from others. They are usually self-sufficient and would rather work alone than in a group. Socializing drains an Introvert’s energy, and they need alone time to recharge. Because of this they put less emphasis on socializing and social skills than an extrovert would. Sensing individuals place great emphasis on what they see, touch and experience in the real world, unlike Intuitive people who would rather live in their imaginations. Prioritizing facts and practicality, those with a Sensing character are outward-looking and prefer not to deal with philosophical ideas or introspective ponderings.

They would rather focus on what they can concretely experience with their senses. Intuitive individuals put emphasis on imagination and ideas, rather than what is actually in front of them. They tend to prioritize introspection and dreaming, and oftentimes feel like they do not belong or live in the real world. Unlike Sensing individuals, who enjoy seeing, touching and experiencing the world, intuitive people are inward-focused and prefer living in their own heads. While Sensing people like facts and practicality, Intuitive individuals tend to lean towards allusions, read between the lines, and analyze things at greater depth.

Thinking individuals are objective, rational, and logical. Their decisions and actions are usually governed more by their minds than by their hearts. Many people often judge Thinking people as lacking emotion, but that is not true. They can be just as emotional and sensitive as the Feeling group, but feelings are not their main priority, and they can hide their emotions or prevent them from coming to the surface.

They prioritize facts over feelings. Individuals with the Feeling trait care more about emotions and expressing them than what is deemed rational or logical. Thinking individuals who prefer to suppress their emotions. Those who focus on feelings and expressions of emotion tend to be more open-minded, vocal, empathetic, and sensitive. Those with the Judging trait tend to strategize and plan before they act.