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Please forward this error screen to 184. In the New Scientist of 12 May, 2001, it was asserted by Chris Hayes that “five is the magic number” of digits. This was based on the assumption that the genetic mutation that produces the extra toes is also responsible for deformities and that possession of best poly dating sites than five digits is a “counter-survival trait”.

His assertion was based on observation of mice with deformities caused by genetic mutations. However, what is true for mice is not necessarily true for other animals and there are many healthy cats with six or more digits. Fossil evidence shows that early amphibians also had 7 or 8 toes. High traffic to this page has led to it being split into 2 pages. The following Yahoogroups are not breed specific. An All-American Trait or an American Conceit? Polydactyly, or extra digits, is a common trait among cats, particularly it seems, among Celtic cats and cats on part of America’s Eastern coast and South West Britain.

This distribution may well be linked. Except for Twisty Cats, polydactyly is not a product of bad breeding. It is simply a naturally occurring genetic variation and, as noted later on, polydactyly is found in fossil reptiles – meaning that five digits might be the abnormal form! Only one form of polydactyly is known to be harmful. Can any readers of THE CAT give me any information about 6-toed cats, sometimes called ‘Boxers’ or ‘Boxing Cats’?

In February 1978, the Daily Mirror carried a series of letters on polydactyl cats. Jennifer Wellstead, of Penzance, Cornwall, had asked if any other readers had cats with 6 toes on each paw. A “Mrs I” of Kettering, Northants, replied that 6-toed cats were favoured as witches’ familiars of witches. She added that a recent litter had produced one kitten with 7 toes, 4 with 6 toes and 2 with the normal number of toes.

A correspondent to the New Scientist noted that the innermost extra toes on the front paws are often opposable and some cats use them with quite startling proficiency to manipulate small objects with almost human dexterity. Some owners of polydactyl cats joke that their cats are more intelligent because of this and represent the next stage in feline evolution – the ability to open cartons and cans unaided. Polydactyl cats are known by various names – “mitten cats”, “thumb cats”, “six-finger cats”, “Cardi cats” and “Hemingway cats”. The latter is because of writer Ernest Hemingway who made his home on the small island of Key West, Florida.